What to do with cracks and gaps on your 3d printed model?

source: 3dinnovation.co.nz
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Having nasty cracks and gaps on your print? That’s delamination, when two layers of your 3d printed object just simply say farewell to each other, leaving a sad, empty void in between. That appears because of lack of interlayer adhesion which is a scientific name for the magical force that keeps those layers firmly together.

 

So what are the main causes of delamination and how to avoid them?

 

Uneven buildplate

As we’ve mentioned earlier, an unleveled bed can really mess up your print, right at the beginning, causing the first few layers to fall apart.

 

Falling off the buildplate

Similar to the previous one; if it doesn’t stick at the first layer, chances are, that the next layers will just aimlessly dangle around. For more tips, see our previous post.

 

Continuous filament flow

Make sure your filament spool rotates freely, and the filament unwinds easily, so the printer won’t have to struggle with pulling it in.

source: reprap.org

source: reprap.org

 

Temperature

ABS’s great tendency to warp is one of the main reasons of delamination. If one layer cools quicker than the next one, their size will change unevenly and finally, the surface will snap. So keep your printing area nice warm and cozy, shielded from cooling drafts. Quickly cooling layers also don’t fuse very well, therefore in case you get a few cracks, it’s a good idea, to adjust the nozzle temperature a bit higher.

 

Don’t rush it

They say, if you want to play the guitar and you keep getting your fingers all tangled up, and that riff still doesn’t sound right, just slow down. Some say, that this also applies for 3d printing in some cases. If you’re all out of ideas, it’s worth giving it a shot.

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