Briefly about 3d scanning #4 – Make your own scanner!

Don't be selfish...Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+2Share on LinkedIn0Share on TumblrPin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Email this to someone

No matter how cheap 3d scanners get, building one might be your cheapest option and it’s also a fun experiment. Instructables.com is a great place to load up on ideas, and tutorials, and it didn’t let us down with this topic as well.

 

User shapespeare has two awesome tutorials on how to get the most out of photogrammetry. This tutorial shows useful tips and tricks on how you can scan virtually anything with almost any camera. He even tries to scan a house, with a VGA cam carried by a drone, and result is surprisingly recognizable.

 

You might even know his other tutorial, since we’ve already featured it on our Facebook page. It’s a tiny arduino-controlled turntable to spin objects around, with pinpoint accuracy to create 3d scans with insane resolution!

 

Another smart and simple solution is the Easy 3d Scanner by user kwe. It’s a turntable, with a mount for compact cameras to take accurate pictures from different angles. It’s dead simple, yet, pretty effective.

 

If you like the compact, boxy design of the CraftBot then you’ll love The Microwave; a box-like rig, with a turntable, an “endless background” and a mount to hold a smartphone. It’s still pretty cheap, simple, but it looks, and works like a pro!

 

In case you want to use structured light, instead of photogrammetry, there’s an option for you as well! If you happen to own a Kinect sensor, then you’re in luck. It has everything you need; a infrared grid for structure light scanning, a camera for capturing color textures, and native support on Windows, so you won’t have to fiddle around, with drivers, and other sort of hacks. This tutorial goes briefly through the process so you can get the basic idea of it.

 

Another interesting project is the open source Ciclop scanner. (see our featured picture at the top of the article!) Load the files and instructions from GitHub, print and order the parts needed, add a webcam, and you’re ready to scan with lasers!

Don't be selfish...Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+2Share on LinkedIn0Share on TumblrPin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Email this to someone

Comments

comments