3D printing video tutorial

3D printing video tutorial
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For all of you that are curious about the 3D printing technology and how it works, here’s a good 3D printing video for you made by RMIT University.

 

In a few words this 3D printing video explains what is 3D printing:

“3D printing is the process of making a three-dimensional solid object from a digital model. 3D printing or additive manufacture is where layer upon layer of material is built up to make an object. The beauty of this technique is that almost any shape can be created in this way.”

 

 

And also, you can find on this 3D printing video a quick and exact explanation of how 3D printing works. So, how do you actually print something in 3D?

“First, a design for the object needs to be completed. The computer generated model is sliced into cross sections for the printer to use as a guideline.

The next step is printing the Object. The 3D printer raise the blueprint and lays down successive layers of material to build the model. A diverse range of materials can be used such as plastics, metals, paper and ceramics. As each layer is printed, it sticks to the previous one to create a cohesive final shape.”

 

This 3D printing video is also good for you to understand some of the applications of 3D printing. Check this out:

“3D printers are capable of printing complex layers that can form moving parts like engines or wheels as part of the same object. You could build a bicicle with handle bars, frames, wheels assembled without the need for any tools. You just have to leave the gaps on the right spots.

3D printing is used across a variety of industries such as high-end manufacture where it’s used for rapid prototyping and research. This allows designers and concept developers the flexibility to produce parts and models on demand then modify this as required. Finally, 3D printing is pushing healthcare into new areas: it’s being used to make medical parts such as custom hearing aids and braces and even to reproduce body parts like customized chip implants or prosthetic hands in exact proportion to fit the patient.”

 

 

Enjoy your printings!

 

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