3D Printing Technology: how does it work?

How 3d Printing Technology works?
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There is a very special kind of technology that is and has been revolutionising the whole world and the way economy may be shaped in the not so far fetched future! More and more there is an increasing awareness to the developments and the benefits of 3D printing technology. There are even those who claim that this fairly recent discovery is the new and 4th Revolution, after the Agricultural Revolution, followed by the Industrial Revolution from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840, and then followed by the Digital Era/Revolution, which marked the beginning of Information Age.

 

The fact is, 3D printing technology isn’t just for scientists or people who simply like to get creative. Nowadays, it is used within all spheres of working contexts, from the automobile industry, medical implants and facial restitutions after accidents and even for NASA spacial projects, as astronauts can now 3d print their food whilst on their outer space missions.

 

So how does in fact 3D printing technology really work?

 

Also named additive manufacturing (AM) 3D printing refers to any of the various processes for printing a three-dimensional object. In opposition to the traditional crafting techniques, where the object is cut out of a bigger solid piece of raw material, 3d printing technology uses primarily additive processes, in which successive layers of material are laid down under computer control, in a similar way of building a lego! These objects can be of almost any shape or form and are produced from a 3d model, like CAD or other software systems.

 

A 3D printer is considered a type of industrial robot. Whatever approach used by a 3D printer, the end result of the printing process is generally the same. There are 7 basic steps for 3D printing technology. No. 1 is to produce a 3D model using computer-aided design (CAD) software. No. 2, convert the CAD drawing to Standard Tessellation Language format (STL). Thirdly, transfer to AM Machine the STL File Manipulation using a Slicer. Step 4 requires you set up the machine. No. 5, let the machine do its thing: build. During step 6, you may remove the object. And lastly, step 7 is name post processing, which at times is necessary to brush off any renaming powder or even bathing the object. And voilá! You are done.

 

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