3D printed world: a beginners dictionary – Part 2

3D printed world: a beginners dictionary - Part 2 Indeed the world is becoming more and more 3D printed! That is why we decided to do an article on a dictionary of the 3D printing world so that you can get familiarised with the terminology of this new and increasingly popular technology. On this second part of the article we will introduce a few more terms! Maybe some you already know? 3D printed world: Modeling The model describes the process of forming the shape of an object. The two most common sources of 3D models are those that an artist or engineer originates on the computer with some kind of 3D modeling tool, and models scanned into a computer from real-world objects. Basically, a 3D model is formed from points called vertices (or vertexes) that define the shape and form polygons. 3D printed world: Computer-aided design (CAD) CAD is the use of computer systems to assist in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimisation of a design. CAD output is often in the form of electronic files for print, machining, or other manufacturing operations. This may not be new for you but it certainly is a vital part of the 3D printed world. Having said that, you don’t need to know how to operate with CAD, as you can download STL files from the Internet, only this way you are limited to the designs you may find. 3D printed world: STL Files (STereoLithography) STL is a file format that is widely used for rapid prototyping anda and computer-aided manufacturing. STL files describe only the surface geometry of a three-dimensional object without any representation of color, texture or other common CAD model attributes. 3D printed world: Bioprinting It is the process of generating 3D structures and geometries utilising cells and an encapsulation material. The medical applications of 3D bioprinting are numerous, and are thus the subject of intensive research at academic institutions. One major application area of bioprinting is in the tissue engineering field of regenerative medicine. In addition to the complexities associated with 3D printing in general, extra considerations must be taken regarding material, cell type, and growth factor selection.
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Indeed the world is becoming more and more 3D printed! That is why we decided to do an article on a dictionary of the 3D printing world so that you can get familiarised with the terminology of this new and increasingly popular technology. On this second part of the article we will introduce a few more terms! Maybe some you already know?

 

3D printed world: Modeling

The model describes the process of forming the shape of an object. The two most common sources of 3D models are those that an artist or engineer originates on the computer with some kind of 3D modeling tool, and models scanned into a computer from real-world objects. Basically, a 3D model is formed from points called vertices (or vertexes) that define the shape and form polygons.

 

3D printed world: Computer-aided design (CAD)

CAD is the use of computer systems to assist in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimisation of a design. CAD output is often in the form of electronic files for print, machining, or other manufacturing operations. This may not be new for you but it certainly is a vital part of the 3D printed world. Having said that, you don’t need to know how to operate with CAD, as you can download STL files from the Internet, only this way you are limited to the designs you may find.

 

3D printed world: STL Files (STereoLithography)

STL is a file format that is widely used for rapid prototyping anda and computer-aided manufacturing. STL files describe only the surface geometry of a three-dimensional object without any representation of color, texture or other common CAD model attributes.

 

3D printed world: Bioprinting

It is the process of generating 3D structures and geometries utilising cells and an encapsulation material. The medical applications of 3D bioprinting are numerous, and are thus the subject of intensive research at academic institutions. One major application area of bioprinting is in the tissue engineering field of regenerative medicine. In addition to the complexities associated with 3D printing in general, extra considerations must be taken regarding material, cell type, and growth factor selection.

 

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