3D printed world: a begginers dictionary

3D printed world: a beginners dictionary
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Everyday the world is becoming more and more 3D printed: 3D printingis a relatively new technology but is already getting a huge community all around the world. And with all this innovation comes also a new language, full of words to explore and the promise of new words to come.

 

That’s why we brought you today some of the most common words used on the 3D printing world. How many of them do you know?

 

Additive manufacturing: This is the principle of all the3D printed objects. Unlike the other printers we are used to, on a 3D printer the object is printed by three dimension and built layer by layer, adding material instead of subtracting it. Think of a Lego construction where you can build an object by simply adding more Lego pieces (that in this case are the layers). This is the opposite of the traditional manufacturing also called the subtractive manufacturing.

 

Desktop 3D printing: Also called the consumer 3D printing, it refers to the new wave of 3D printed projects created by individuals on their homes. This big revolution is not reaching only companies but also makers and creators who found on this new technology a great way to create better products. With the increase of desktop 3D printers on the market, everyone is able to create their own 3D printed objects, from toys to clothes to anything that you can actually imagine.

 

PLA: One of the most common materials used to create 3D printed objects on the additive manufacturing proccess.

 

ABS: One of the most common materials used to create 3D printed objects on the additive manufacturing proccess.

 

Blueprint: Also called the STL file,this is the 3D model of the object you want to print – without it you can’t go further with your 3D printing. To create a 3D printed object you’ll need this blueprintby using a modeling software or simply by downloading it on free STL model websites.

 

Slicer software: Before creating the 3D printed object and printing a STL file, the 3D model must first be processed by a software called slicer which converts the model into the toolpath information understood by 3D printers.

 

G-code: To create a toolpath information understood by 3D printers, the slicer software converts the STL model into layers and produces a G-code file that contains instructions for a specific printer. Basically, the G-code is the responsible to give the instructions to the 3D printer in order to build the model and make your 3D printed object.

 

 

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